Sports Injuries

Gymnastics Injuries: EP Wellness and Functional Medicine Clinic

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Gymnastics is a demanding and challenging sport. Gymnasts train to be powerful and graceful. Today’s moves have become increasingly technical acrobatic moves with a much higher degree of risk and difficulty. All the stretching, bending, twisting, jumping, flipping, etc., increases the risk of neuromusculoskeletal injuries. Gymnastics injuries are inevitable. Bruises, cuts, and scrapes are common, as are overuse strains and sprains, but severe and traumatic injuries can occur. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Team can treat and rehabilitate injuries and help to strengthen and prevent injuries. The therapy team will thoroughly evaluate the individual to determine the injury/s severity, identify any weaknesses or limitations, and develop a personalized plan for optimal recovery, stability, and strength.

Gymnastic Injuries

One of the main reasons injuries are more prevalent is because today’s athletes start earlier, spend more time practicing, perform more complex skill sets, and have higher levels of competition. Gymnasts learn to perfect a skill and then train to make their bodies look elegant while executing the routine. These moves require precision, timing, and hours of practice.

Injury Types

Sports injuries are classified as:

  • Chronic Overuse injuries: These cumulative aches and pains occur over time.
  • They can be treated with chiropractic and physical therapy and prevented with targeted training and recovery.
  • Acute Traumatic injuries: These are typically accidents that happen suddenly without warning.
  • These require immediate first aid.

Most Common Injuries

Gymnasts are taught how to fall and land to lessen the impact on the spine, head, neck, knees, ankles, and wrists. 

Back

Bruises and Contusions

  • Tumbling, twisting, and flipping can result in various bruises and contusions.

Muscle Soreness

  • This is the sort of muscle soreness experienced 12 to 48 hours after a workout or competition.
  • Proper rest is necessary for the body to recover fully.

Overtraining Syndrome

Sprains and Strains

  • Sprains and strains.
  • The R.I.C.E. method is recommended.

Ankle Sprains

  • Ankle sprains are the most common.
  • When there is a stretching and tearing of ligaments surrounding the ankle joint.

Wrist Sprains

  • A sprained wrist happens when stretching or tearing the ligaments of the wrist.
  • Falling or landing hard on the hands during handsprings is a common cause.

Stress Fractures

  • Leg stress fractures result from overuse and repeated impact from tumbling and landings.

The most common include:

  • Shoulder instability.
  • Ankle sprains.
  • Achilles tendon strains or tears.
  • Gymnasts wrist.
  • Colles’ fracture.
  • Hand and Finger injuries.
  • Cartilage damage.
  • Knee discomfort and pain symptoms.
  • A.C.L. tears – anterior cruciate ligament.
  • Burners and stingers.
  • Low back discomfort and pain symptoms.
  • Herniated discs.
  • Spinal fractures.

Causes

  • Insufficient flexibility.
  • Decreased strength in the arms, legs, and core.
  • Balance issues.
  • Strength and/or flexibility imbalances – one side is stronger.

Chiropractic Care

Our therapists will start with an evaluation and a biomechanical assessment to identify all the factors contributing to the injury. This will consist of a thorough medical history to understand overall health status, training schedule, and the physical demands on the body. The chiropractor will develop a comprehensive program that includes manual and tool-assisted pain relief techniques, mobilization work, MET, core strengthening, targeted exercises, and injury prevention strategies.


Facet Syndrome Chiropractic Treatment


References

Armstrong, Ross, and Nicola Relph. “Screening Tools as a Predictor of Injury in Gymnastics: Systematic Literature Review.” Sports medicine – open vol. 7,1 73. 11 Oct. 2021, doi:10.1186/s40798-021-00361-3

Farì, Giacomo, et al. “Musculoskeletal Pain in Gymnasts: A Retrospective Analysis on a Cohort of Professional Athletes.” International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 18,10 5460. 20 May. 2021, doi:10.3390/ijerph18105460

Kreher, Jeffrey B, and Jennifer B Schwartz. “Overtraining syndrome: a practical guide.” Sports Health vol. 4,2 (2012): 128-38. doi:10.1177/1941738111434406

Meeusen, R, and J Borms. “Gymnastic injuries.” Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) vol. 13,5 (1992): 337-56. doi:10.2165/00007256-199213050-00004

Sweeney, Emily A et al. “Returning to Sport After Gymnastics Injuries.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 17,11 (2018): 376-390. doi:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000533

Westermann, Robert W et al. “Evaluation of Men’s and Women’s Gymnastics Injuries: A 10-Year Observational Study.” Sports Health vol. 7,2 (2015): 161-5. doi:10.1177/1941738114559705

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Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Gymnastics Injuries: EP Wellness and Functional Medicine Clinic" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional.

Blog Information & Scope Discussions

Our information scope is limited to Chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, contributing etiological viscerosomatic disturbances within clinical presentations, associated somatovisceral reflex clinical dynamics, subluxation complexes, sensitive health issues, and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions.

We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez, DC, or contact us at 915-850-0900.

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Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, RN*, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed as a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) in Texas & New Mexico*
Texas DC License # TX5807, New Mexico DC License # NM-DC2182

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Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, RN* CIFM*, IFMCP*, ATN*, CCST
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